Educational Lessons

Myfish? Our Fish!

guidetothegame

Learning Objectives:

The purpose of this activity is to introduce the many factors involved in sustainable fisheries management and to acquaint pupils with the various decisionmaking processes involved by playing a simple, enjoyable role-playing game.

Acknowledgement:

This lesson was written and illustrated by John Joyce (AquaTT) within the framework of the Myfish project.

Download the Lesson Plan here

Download the Guide to the Game here

 

What Are Sustainable Fishing Practices?

Learning Objectives:

This lesson demonstrates to students that; 1) Sustainable fishing practices that reduce bycatch and leave fish for future generations are important; 2) Marine protected areas (MPAs) protect certain areas of the ocean from harmful human activity; 3) Rules and policies are important in protecting the interests of many people.

Acknowledgement:

This lesson was developed as part of the "Healthy Ocean, Healthy Humans" curriculum from the Center of Health and the Global Environment at Harvard Medical School. This curriculum aims to build students' understanding of the importance of the ocean for humans and develop students' appreciation of the ocean. For further information please visit: http://www.healthyoceans.org/

 

Vertebrates / Going Green? Evaluating “Sustainable” Seafood  

Learning Objectives:

This lesson provides a survey of common marine vertebrates including reptiles, fish, sharks, rays and reptiles. It provides students with the basic taxonomy of these classes, with a focus on fish and the management of commercial fish populations. In the activity, students will apply their knowledge of fish populations to describe what it means to manage commercial fisheries “sustainably.” Then, they will use National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) FishWatch program to evaluate seafood options at restaurants.

Acknowledgement:

This lesson was developed for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries by Molly Harrison, Education and Outreach Coordinator for NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Protected Resources, and edited by Michiko Martin, Outreach and Education Division Chief for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. For further information please visit: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education.

 

Game of Life

Learning Objectives:

Making choices to sustain seafood populations starts with an understanding of the role each species plays in their ecosystem and the result of their removal from that ecosystem. Through the game in this lesson, students will understand the effects of overfishing on the sustainability of fish stocks and, thus, the ability to meet the human demand for seafood. By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to explain why overfishing has occurred in our oceans and describe the effects of over-fishing on fish stocks.

Acknowledgement:

This lesson was developed for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries by Molly Harrison, Education and Outreach Coordinator for NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Protected Resources, and edited by Michiko Martin, Outreach and Education Division Chief for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. For further information please visit: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education.

 

Fish & Kids Education Pack

Learning Objectives:

The Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) runs the leading international certification and ecolabelling programme for sustainable fishing. Fish and Kids is the MSC’s education programme developed to encourage schools to feature sustainable seafood on their school menus and to increase children’s knowledge of marine ecosystems, sustainable fishing and consumer power. These teaching resources aim to educate children about the world of seafood and the importance of protecting the marine environment. Children will increase their knowledge and understanding of the sea, its creatures, the fishermen and women that depend on it and the threats they all face.

Acknowledgement:

This education pack was developed by The Marine Stewardship Council as part of their Fish and Kids education programme. If you want to know more please visit the website at www.fishandkids.org . Here you’ll find further teaching resources, information for school caterers and a children’s area with games, quizzes and fascinating facts.

 

ecoOcean

Learning Objectives:

The primary goal of this computer game is to demonstrate the common pool problem to the interested public. 4 players have the target to achieve as much points as possible by catching fish. All players rely on the same fish stock and therefore compete for the resource, as given in common pool resources. The game is parameterized in a way that the fish stock will be depleted very soon, if all players catch as much as they can. Only by communicating and sticking to common rules, a sustainable, higher overall catch can be reached in the game. This spatially resolving model can be set-up for experimental economic research and address questions of marine protected areas as well as of landing obligations and discards. Download the game here http://www.naymspace.de/en/projects/ecoocean

Acknowledgement:

This game was developed by Dennis Nissen (http://www.ecoocean.de/info/) as part of the SOCIOEC project (http://www.socioec.eu/).

flagsThe research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7 /2007-2013) under grant agreement no 289257. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the European Union cannot be held responsible for any use which maybe made of the information contained therein.